A Free and Hardy Life: Theodore Roosevelt’s Sojourn in the American West

By Clay S. Jenkinson. Hardcover, 176 pages. Member discount does not apply to sale items.
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Theodore Roosevelt ventured into the American West to seek authentic frontier experience and the strenuous life. The New York aristocrat traveled to western Dakota Territory in 1883 to kill his first buffalo. He got his buffalo, but he also fell in love with the badlands of what is now North Dakota.
 
On impulse, Roosevelt invested a significant portion of his wealth in two badlands ranches, and he spent the better part of 1883–87 ranching, hunting, serving as deputy sheriff, writing books, and attempting to become an authentic American cowboy. In North Dakota the New York dude became the Theodore Roosevelt who led a cowboy brigade of cavalrymen up Kettle and San Juan Hills in 1898 and then led the American people into the twentieth century as the twenty-sixth president of the United States.
 
This book contains 70 stories, many set in Dakota Territory, about Roosevelt’s life as an adventurer, politician, and man of letters, lavishly illustrated with more than 100 photographs, some never previously published. Clay S. Jenkinson’s introduction assesses what Roosevelt learned from his sojourn in the West, including his commitment to conservation of America’s natural resources. With a foreword by best-selling biographer Douglas Brinkley, this book tells the story of Theodore Roosevelt’s life in his own words, carefully excerpted from his 1913 autobiography.

Hardcover, 176 pages.